Naptural Beauty

I never knew that something so wild could be tamed. I sometimes wondered why the tool for taming had a fist on its end. I even wondered why the rod used to tame our roots resided in the kitchen where the tools for cooking were kept. Some of us still cringe when we go to the hair salon to smooth out our tresses’ natural inclination to knot and nap and loc as if they’ve gone mad – clenched into little fists throwing fits until the rod turns hot, its temper flairs, and it straightens our hair – making it Smooth.

We haven’t all embraced the Smooth Movement though.  Oh no! Not I. My naptural beauty can’t be tamed for long by the straightening comb, the flat iron, or the pullers. My hair is the stubborn type that laughs in the face of the three amigos I like to call the Caliente Trio. They can’t fight the urge to revert when my hair joins forces with Mother Nature.  That chic is fierce, and she comes in many forms! Rain, sleet, snow, and fog – she’s a Transformer.

I met a lady yesterday who said “I love your hair.” I thanked her – thinking my gigantic afro puff was a mess of tresses, but she called it beautiful. We talked briefly about transitioning from Smooth and silky to naptural beauty. All I could tell her is that I feel free – not forced to conform, not offended by others’ curiosity, not ashamed of my mane. It’s a work in progress, you see. Not all little Black girls view their natural hair as beauty. That type of thinking stems from images of beauty that we could never achieve except with a weave. Even if I wanted to be shackled to the Smooth Operator each week for a wash and press or a wash and pull or a wash and flat iron, I can’t stand the heat.

My style is diverse: twisted, untwisted, cornrowed, rodded, or braided. That’s my style. Embrace your naptural beauty – your version of Good Hair.After all, it’s God’s gift to you. In my world, there are no bad hair days – just countless opportunities to smooth back my edges, twist my tresses, part and separate my afro puffs, and sashay away. Don’t let your best accessory weigh you down. Let it serve as your crown.

NOTE – The post is in response to The Daily Prompt. The word of the day is Smooth.

 

Published by

Michelle Malone

I started this blog as a means of chronicling my journey of Servant Leadership, but I believe that it has taken on a deeper purpose. It has become a ministry tool. As visitors read about my every day experiences as seen through a spiritual lens, they are fed with the word of God. My hope is that you find encouragement here, and when you do, please share it with me. Encouragers need encouragement too.

32 thoughts on “Naptural Beauty

  1. Through my fellow bloggers I am learning about such things and realizing its about being yourself and doing what’s best for you. Natural hair among other things is good. If it saves you time and money then that is awesome.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Ok I don’t have naptural beauty but I do know a thing or two about coarse, thick, frizzy hair…I’m speaking of mine!! My whole life I’ve dealt with it…obviously! And I must confess when I met Mr. Flat Iron I fell in love! I never knew my hair could feel so soft and look so silky…so I applaud you for embracing your naptural beauty and I totally get where you are coming from, but I must continue to embrace Mr. Flat Iron! 😉 tee hee

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Love this! I have curly hair and was encouraged by my family to embrace it. My dad used to refer to my frizz as sunshine:).
    It wasn’t until I started l really started to feel pressured to get it under control. Mainly because was told it wasn’t professional. Thankfully laziness got the better of me and I opted for braids and updos rather than the iron. Nearly 10 years into my career and I get loads of compliments on those days I let my curls loose.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. HA! Professional? What profession?? My daughter had the most gorgeous dreadlocks (with her natural red/auburn color), wore those to her conferences with political whos-its in DC, and at 5’9″ and red dreads, they remembered who she was! I get the impression it added to her influence (great personality, sense of humor, and very good speaking skill). Forgive me, proud mama.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Nothing to forgive 🙂 It’s insane the things women say to each other! In retrospect I think she wasn’t comfortable with me being comfortable in my own skin.
        Unfortunately i was young enough and just insecure enough to believe it for a while.

        Liked by 2 people

  4. I so relate and connect with this. You know I took the scissors to my straightened hair and it’s been me and my naps girl. I love the freedom. I’m currently wearing them in locks and no more straighteners for me. Full Stop! You rock my dear 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  5. I hear you loud and clear. As a child I loved my pink hair (baby-fine, bodyless, medium strawberry blonde). Now that it’s silver, pewter with streaks of brass, it’s still limp (except in humidity when it’s wild and Frizzy), I laugh remembering those pink tresses now. LOL! We do well to be glad with what God gives us ;).

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Hi Michelle,

    How’ve you been?

    Lol @ ” The Smooth Operator” I enjoyed reading this post. It’s interesting how sometimes we see our own beauty through the eyes of others and it helps us validate ourselves even more.

    I recall the song by India Arie ” I am not my hair”. Still, I believe that to a significant extent, we ARE our hair. We care for our hair, love it and spend time & money grooming it. Some times, a bad hair day can spoil one’s mood and a good hair day is like walking on sunshine. 😀

    Afro hair is absolutely beautiful. I especially love how versatile it is.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I was born with lots of thin hair. When it is super short or to my shoulders it is straight. Anywhere in between it curls in silly little wisps that will go in any direction but the one you want. I love your hair. In my younger days, I had many perms to try to give me a similar look whether the short curls or long curls. Today, I am going to get my hair cut short enough to remove the spindly little curls that I have so much trouble dealing with these days (pain makes holding my arms up very difficult). This whole post is not so much about hair but about being yourself and it is something we all need to hear.

    Like

  8. I’m a redhead with frizz all the way to my butt!! I get a lot of compliments, but sometime I wish it would make up it’s mind, smooth or curly. I had microbraids one time for a camping trip and it was the best!!! I wish I had the time (8 hours!) and money to keep it like that!

    Like

  9. Loved the article! I actually recently found out a local businesses directory which shows top rated local businesses including top hair salons in your city, it’s named Pajix , this is their website http://www.pajix.com , I found my hair stylist on there, you can read other customers reviews, check location and hair salons prices and then book your appointments online! It’s really convenient

    Like

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